hello, valentino

I previously posted about the current APT6 exhibition at the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA). Now, it turns out that GoMA will also be hosting the Valentino Retrospective next year. Yes. THE Valentino. I’m kind of supercalifragilistifreakin excited.

Prior to the Valentino Retrospective, there will also be a Ron Mueck exhibit. You know, the guy that makes those realistic looking, larger than life sculptures. I’m also very excited about seeing this. If you haven’t heard of him, check out his work. It’s crazy.

P.S. I love you GoMA, you’re one of the best things to happen to this town.

Image source: nytimes

pixcell

PixCell Elk #2 – Kohei Nawa

The 6th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (phew, that was a mouthful, which is why it will be referred to as APT6 from now on) opens at the Gallery of Modern Art today. I’m kind of excited because everything in this exhibition looks amazing. One of the artworks I’m most excited about seeing is PixCell Elk #2 by Kohei Nawa. Yes, that’s a real elk under there. Now, while taxidermy in general just freaks me out, I think I might be able to put that fear aside in order to view this work. He’s done this whole ‘PixCell’ series where he’s covered the entire surface of a variety of objects in glass beads. The objects range from stuffed animals to Mickey Mouse toys. The overall effect in some of the works is truly awe inspiring.

The APT6 runs from 5 December 2009 – 5 April 2010 at the Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art. For more info go: here.

To see more of the PixCell series, and Kohei Nawa’s work go: here

oriental

Numero (Issue #104)
Editorial: En Revanche
Photographers: Sofia Sanchez & Mauro Mongiello
Image credit: tfs

I absolutely adore this editorial in Numero magazine. I’ve always loved the art of Japanese prints and I think that this editorial takes a lot of inspiration from it. If not, that’s still my interpretation of it anyway. For those who may not know alot about Japanese art (heck, I only know the bare basics), the most popular form of Japanese woodblock printing was ukiyo-e (which translates into “pictures of the floating world”). Ukiyo-e rose to popularity during the Edo period and prints often depicted motifs of landscapes, tales from history and theatre. (Thanks Wikipedia). The most recognisable Japanese woodblock print has to be Hokusai’s The Great Wave off Kanawaga, which has also become quite the pop culture reference:



Prints by Kitagawa Utamaro (left) and Suzuki Harunobu (right)

Image credit: wikipedia and google

head cold

Melanie Bonajo – Monday Morning

If a picture could best describe how I felt when I woke up this morning, this would be it. Minus the food on the floor. I came down with a cold yesterday and I’m feeling at least seventeen different kinds of blah.

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