APT8

Untitled

The 8th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT8) has recently opened at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art and earlier this week I popped by to check it out. The APT exhibitions are the Gallery’s flagship contemporary art series and they’re the only exhibition series to in the world to focus on the contemporary art of Asia, Australia and the Pacific. I grew up going to see the APT exhibitions and they’re always a memorable experience. The current exhibition features many larger than life works and interactive and sensory experiences. My favourite had to be the  installation by Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh and Hesam Rahmanian which was a recreation of their Dubai home-studio (spoiler: it’s bonkers). I visited the exhibition with my mum and I’m pretty sure her favourite was the structure by Asim Waqif which looked like a bunch of pylons but is embedded with lights and sensors to be triggered by the viewer (seriously I don’t think I’ve ever seen my mum so amused by something). APT8 runs until April next year and entry is free.


Top tip: wear footwear that you can easily remove as there are a few installations that require you to remove your shoes in order to participate (I was wearing buckled sandals and couldn’t be bothered constantly taking them off and putting them back on).



APT8
APT8
APT8
APT8
APT8
APT8
1, 2 & 3. Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh and Sesam Rahmanian / “All The Rivers Run Into The Sea. Over.” / “Copy. Yet, The Sea Is Not Full. Over.” 2015
4. Warped mother-daughter selfies in the walls around Choi Jeong Hwa’s The Mandala of Flowers 

5. Choi Jong Hwa / Cosmos 2015
6. Min Thein Sung / Another Realm (horses) 2015
7. Asim Waqif / All we leave behind are the memories 2015

[Images captured on iPhone 6 and edited with the VSCO app]

Sydney Travel: Art Galleries

Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney

Hi, my name is Sophie and I’m an art gallery junkie. For me, no trip is complete without a cultural excursion to an art gallery. It’s one way for me to stack cities up against each other. “You’ve got James Turrell? Well WE’VE got David Lynch” etc. My trip to Sydney coincided with the opening of the Light Show exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art, which I was really looking forward to. Photos weren’t allowed inside the actual exhibit (although plenty of people were trying) so the ones here are from the Luminous exhibit and other collections. The next day I escaped the torrential rain and retreated to the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Despite visiting the art galleries on separate occasions, they’re so close by that you could easily nerd out and make a day of it. While there was plenty to see at the Art Gallery of NSW, I did go during a weird in-between phase so a few of the collections were in the process of either being dismantled or put together. Turns out I missed out on some really interesting exhibits like Loud! and Matisse And The Moderns by only a few days. While there are plenty of other galleries in Sydney I would have loved to have visited, like the White Rabbit Gallery, the MCA and Art Gallery of NSW are must-dos for those short on time.

Museum of Contemporary Art

Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney
Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney
Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney
Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney

Art Gallery of NSW
Art Gallery of NSW
Art Gallery of NSW
Art Gallery of NSW
Art Gallery of NSW
Art Gallery of NSW
Art Gallery of NSW
[Images taken on an iPhone 6 and edited in VSCOcam]

What’s On at GoMA

Michael Parekowhai exhibit at GoMA
I went to the Gallery of Modern Art on the weekend to check out a few of their latest exhibits (you can see my last trip to the Future Beauty exhibit here). The big drawcard right now is the David Lynch: Between Two Worlds retrospective but there’s also the recently opened Michael Parekowhai: The Promised Land exhibit, the Japanese Art After 1989 exhibit, and the gallery’s collection of Indigenous art on display as well. While the David Lynch retrospective is on the unsettling/moody/messed up side of things, the Michael Parekowhai and Japanese art exhibits are a good remedy to that. I’ve already shared some photos over on Instagram but here are a few more that I snapped on my iPhone.

Michael Parekowhai exhibit at GoMA
Michael Parekowhai exhibit at GoMA Michael Parekowhai exhibit at GoMA
David Lynch: Between Two Worlds
David Lynch: Between Two Worlds Japanese Art After 1989
Japanese Art After 1989
Japanese Art After 1989

Michael Parekowhai: The Promised Land
1. He Kōrero Pūrākau Te Awanui o Te Moto: Story of a New Zealand River, 2011 & Rules of the Game, 2015
2. Home Front, 2015
3. The Horn of Africa, 2006
4. The English Channel, 2015

David Lynch: Between Two Worlds
5. I forget what this series was called. Oops.
6. Woman With  Dream, 2007

We Can Make a Better Future: Japanese Art After 1989
7. Y.N.G.M.S. (Y.N.G.’s Mobile Studio), 2009 by Yoshitomo Nara and graf
8. PixCell Double Deer #4, 2010 by Kohei Nawa
9. Soul Under the Moon, 2002 by Yayoi Kusama. I’ve visited this installation pretty much every time it’s been on display at the gallery. The first time I was still in high school. I still love it.

Future Beauty

Future Beauty-001
At the end of last year I went to the Future Beauty exhibition at the Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane. I’m only getting around to posting about it now because… laziness? The exhibition explores the innovation of Japanese designers from the 1980s onwards. A host of designers are covered in the exhibition but some of the most notable names include Rei Kawakubo, Yohji Yamamoto, and Junya Watanabe. Being able to observe garments up close, as well as seeing some laid out flat, gives you a greater understanding of how intricate the pieces really are and the kind of mastery required to be able to manipulate seemingly simple pieces of fabric. Technically you’re not supposed to take photos inside the exhibition but I took a few sneaky snaps because I am a delinquent. Complementing the exhibition throughout the gallery are works by Japanese artists like Yayoi Kusama and the return of the Obliteration Room. I also couldn’t resist revisiting the Pip & Pop dioramas in the Children’s Art Centre because they are my favourite. Future Beauty ends on February 15 so if you haven’t seen it already I’d suggest you get a move on.

Future Beauty
Future Beauty
Future Beauty


Photos taken on an iPhone 6 and edited in VSCO cam

Sad Girls Zine

Sad Girls is “a zine featuring work by girls who make things and have lots of feelings”. As a girl who sometimes makes things and always has feelings, I was pretty sure that this was a zine after my own super emosh heart. Contributors include the likes of Leah Goren, Caitlin Shearer and Jen Collins. The zines feature a mix of illustration, photography, and text. I missed the boat when Issue 1 came out a while back but I checked into the Sad Girls Etsy before I headed overseas to find all three issues in stock (spoiler alert: only Issues 2 and 3 are currently available). As such, they ended up being a little bit of a homecoming present to myself. I’m not sure if it’s a proven cure for jet lag but browsing through my Sad Girls zines made me feel 100% better. Hurrah!